Ish (Creatrilogy) Hardcover – August 19, 2004

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A creative spirit learns that thinking “ish-ly” is far more wonderful than “getting it right” in this gentle new fable from the creator of the award-winning picture book The Dot.Ramon loved to draw. Anytime. Anything. Anywhere.Drawing is what Ramon does. It¹s what makes him happy. But in one split second, all that changes. A single reckless remark by Ramon’s older brother, Leon, turns Ramon’s carefree sketches into joyless struggles. Luckily for Ramon, though, his little sister, Marisol, sees the world differently. She opens his eyes to something a lot more valuable than getting things just “right.” Combining the spareness of fable with the potency of parable, Peter Reynolds shines a bright beam of light on the need to kindle and tend our creative flames with care.

From School Library Journal

SELF-AWARENESS

From Booklist

PreS-Gr. 2. Reynolds’ previous book, The Dot (see Top 10 Arts Books for Youth on p.497), imparted a very powerful message to kids about the quite a lot of ways in which art will also be defined. This has a similar message, but unlike the character in The Dot, who doesn’t consider she can draw, Ramon loves to draw. In reality, he draws wherever he can, even on the toilet. But after his older brother laughs at his work, Ramon loses confidence; none of his drawings look right to him anymore. He’s about to quit drawing when his sister shows him that she has kept all his crumpled efforts. Now he understands that though he doesn’t draw exact replicas (his trees are only “tree-ish”), the response his art engenders is what matters. It’s likely that fewer children will identify with Ramon than with the girl in the previous book, but this certainly has a strong message, and the overriding theme about creativity versus exactitude will resonate with many. The line-and-color artwork is simple, but it has great emotion and warmth. Kids will respond to that, too. Ilene Cooper
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

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A creative spirit learns that thinking “ish-ly” is far more wonderful than “getting it right” in this gentle new fable from the author of the award-winning picture book The Dot.Ramon loved to draw. Anytime. Anything. Anywhere.Drawing is what Ramon does. It¹s what makes him happy. But in one split second, all that changes. A single reckless observation by Ramon’s older brother, Leon, turns Ramon’s carefree sketches into joyless struggles. Luckily for Ramon, though, his little sister, Marisol, sees the world another way. She opens his eyes to something a lot more valuable than getting things just “right.” Combining the spareness of fable with the potency of parable, Peter Reynolds shines a bright beam of light on the want to kindle and have a tendency our creative flames with care.