Full Moon Lore

As an Amazon Associate, we earn from qualifying purchases. Your purchases help us support important charities.

$16.99 (as of August 18, 2019, 2:30 am) & FREE Shipping. Details $7.91

From School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 2—This picture book takes readers through a calendar year of full moons. A cursory introduction explains, “People long ago kept track of the seasons by giving each full moon a special name.” Each month’s unique moon is identified, from January’s Wolf Moon, to June’s Strawberry Moon, to December’s Cold Moon, and closing with the additional Blue Moon. The lyrical text briefly explores the lunar lore at the back of the names: as April’s Pink Moon heralds the arrival of spring blossoms, “It was believed that the moon used his hand to sprinkle the ground with seeds.” Stewart’s full-page realistic illustrations capture many atmospheric details of the changing seasons and the resulting effect on wildlife. November’s spread depicts the Hunter Moon illuminating ploughed fields full of rolled bales of hay as an owl and a fox search for food in the foreground. An end page includes nine assorted scientific facts about the moon, as well as a summary list of the full moon names noted. On the other hand, there are no source notes as to the cultural origins of the names selected. VERDICT This poetic remedy works best as a general introduction to the topic.—Linda Ludke, London Public Library, Ont.

Review

There is something magical about a full moon. People in all places the world will, when the moon is full, look up and gaze at the glowing orb in the night sky with awe or delight. In many cultures the full moon is associated with a story or a tradition. In truth, full moons are ceaselessly given a special name, depending on when they appear. In this book readers will learn the names of twelve full moons, each one of which is associated with a month of the year. We begin in January with a Wolf Moon. This is the time of year when snow lies on the ground in many places, and in certain parts of the world, on the night of the full moon, wolves raise their noses to the sky above and howl. The Sap Moon rises in March, the month when the Vernal or Spring Equinox takes place. Winter is in spite of everything coming to a close, and sap starts to rise as the trees begin to wake up. In North America people will tap maple trees as this time of year for the sap, which they cook and turn into maple syrup. July brings us the Buck Moon. This moon gets its name from deer bucks, who grow new antlers at this time of year. In September the Harvest Moon shines down on the land where farmers are busy gathering, preparing, and storing the fruits of their labor. With its lush illustrations and its beautifully lyrical text, this picture book captures the magical qualities of the full moon, and it also gives us a picture of what is taking place in nature all through every month of the year. –Through the Looking Glass Children’s Book Reviews

Every month has a full moon, and every full moon has a story. Deftly written by Ellen Wahi and beautifully illustrated all over by Ashley Stewart, “Full Moon Lore” explores the origins of each full moon’s name, from the Strawberry Moon to the Wolf Moon and beyond. Told in rolling prose with delightful nighttime illustrations, this picture book for children ages 5 to 8 is a story is a sweet look at nature, seasons, and the mystery of the full moon. Of special note is the inclusion of ‘Moon Facts’ and additional background information. Whilst very highly recommended for family, elementary school, and community library picture book collections, it should be noted that “Full Moon Lore” is also available in a Kindle format. –The Picturebook Shelf

Every month has a full moon, and every full moon has a story. Full Moon Lore explores the origins of each full moon’s name, from the Strawberry Moon to the Wolf Moon and beyond. Told in rolling prose with delightful nighttime illustrations, this story is a sweet look at nature, seasons, and the mystery of the full moon. Includes Moon Facts and additional backmatter.